Index

Monday morning, 19th May 2014, Spring Equinox
At Half Moon a sense of collapse, a spent energy, the fleshy stems begin to give, the blue will begin to seep away.

At Half Moon a sense of collapse, a spent energy, the fleshy stems begin to give, the blue will begin to seep away. May 2011
Plant, light, dye destruction print
44.5 x 38.5 cm / 17.5 x 15 " (framed)

MB] To me, there’s a suggestion that the petal, the flower, might represent something like the human body, and that it becomes embodied, and that’s the period of existence of a human lifetime in an embodied, physical form. There are connections between physically embodied forms, of which some of the most beautiful and elegant are flower forms that emerge out of nothing and disappear again. It is very tempting to connect a similar understanding with the much evolved form of human beings. It seems that you’re suggesting that there’s a parallel there.

 

GFM] I don’t disagree with any of that. I think it’s something to do with its constancy. The flower gives of itself almost invisibly, serves its reproductive purpose, then fades and decays and falls back into the ground. It can be observed or not by anyone. I’m attracted to that kind of unseen giving; I find that very powerful. I’m also spending a lot of time thinking about why life makes sense living on Dartmoor. I’ve been thinking about how I experience time here. I feel a deep and ancient sense of time. I’m drawn to the earliest artifacts and traces that survive from people who inhabited this place. They speak of many things - the importance of fertility, the fundamental need to reproduce, grow food, sustain life at an elemental level. Working with plants and flowers reconnects me in some way to this and I’m quite glad to be back in that place for a while.

 

From That I Might See, Garry Fabian Miller in conversation with Martin Barnes.

HackelBury Fine Art, London, 2011.

1/3