Delphinium 1-8

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Homeland, Summer 1990

Flower, light, dye destruction print

each panel 28.5 x 28.5 cm / 11.25 x 11.25 "

 

In his earliest ‘photogenic drawings’, Talbot placed botanical specimens directly onto light-sensitive paper to record their image. Like falling through leaves and petals revealed a silhouette as well as intricate veins. He titled one such picture Ghost of a Plant. Emerging like a fellow apparition is Fabian Miller's sequence of images of a single flower petal, Delphinium, Homeland, Summer (1990). This was made in one day by placing the petal itself directly into an enlarger and timing subtle gradations of exposure length for each print. Too much or too little light made the form invisible. The images seem like the perceptible segment of our visible world, the rest of which is outside the realm of our visible spectrum. Taking the poetic implications of Talbot’s experiments on a journey, Delphinium explores the notion of latent image.

 

From the exhibition guide Light / The Visible Reminder of the Invisible by Martin Barnes.

Graves Art Gallery, Sheffield, 2002.

 

 

The cycle of emergence is also the subject of an earlier work, Delphinium 1–8 (1990). Made from a single delphinium petal over the course of a day, this sequence of images begins as almost imperceptible tracings of form, gathering weight and deepening in colour until the petal becomes visible. It is concerned with the transformation of light into matter, suggesting the perceptible stage of a natural and cyclical process while hinting at events occurring beyond the visible spectrum.

 

Shadow Catchers by Martin Barnes, from his essay ‘Illuminations’. New edition 2012. Merrell/Victoria and Albert Museum.

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Delphinium 1-8

Read more

Homeland, Summer 1990

Flower, light, dye destruction print

each panel 28.5 x 28.5 cm / 11.25 x 11.25 "

 

In his earliest ‘photogenic drawings’, Talbot placed botanical specimens directly onto light-sensitive paper to record their image. Like falling through leaves and petals revealed a silhouette as well as intricate veins. He titled one such picture Ghost of a Plant. Emerging like a fellow apparition is Fabian Miller's sequence of images of a single flower petal, Delphinium, Homeland, Summer (1990). This was made in one day by placing the petal itself directly into an enlarger and timing subtle gradations of exposure length for each print. Too much or too little light made the form invisible. The images seem like the perceptible segment of our visible world, the rest of which is outside the realm of our visible spectrum. Taking the poetic implications of Talbot’s experiments on a journey, Delphinium explores the notion of latent image.

 

From the exhibition guide Light / The Visible Reminder of the Invisible by Martin Barnes.

Graves Art Gallery, Sheffield, 2002.

 

 

The cycle of emergence is also the subject of an earlier work, Delphinium 1–8 (1990). Made from a single delphinium petal over the course of a day, this sequence of images begins as almost imperceptible tracings of form, gathering weight and deepening in colour until the petal becomes visible. It is concerned with the transformation of light into matter, suggesting the perceptible stage of a natural and cyclical process while hinting at events occurring beyond the visible spectrum.

 

Shadow Catchers by Martin Barnes, from his essay ‘Illuminations’. New edition 2012. Merrell/Victoria and Albert Museum.

Back to top

Delphinium 1-8

Read more

Homeland, Summer 1990

Flower, light, dye destruction print

each panel 28.5 x 28.5 cm / 11.25 x 11.25 "

 

In his earliest ‘photogenic drawings’, Talbot placed botanical specimens directly onto light-sensitive paper to record their image. Like falling through leaves and petals revealed a silhouette as well as intricate veins. He titled one such picture Ghost of a Plant. Emerging like a fellow apparition is Fabian Miller's sequence of images of a single flower petal, Delphinium, Homeland, Summer (1990). This was made in one day by placing the petal itself directly into an enlarger and timing subtle gradations of exposure length for each print. Too much or too little light made the form invisible. The images seem like the perceptible segment of our visible world, the rest of which is outside the realm of our visible spectrum. Taking the poetic implications of Talbot’s experiments on a journey, Delphinium explores the notion of latent image.

 

From the exhibition guide Light / The Visible Reminder of the Invisible by Martin Barnes.

Graves Art Gallery, Sheffield, 2002.

 

 

The cycle of emergence is also the subject of an earlier work, Delphinium 1–8 (1990). Made from a single delphinium petal over the course of a day, this sequence of images begins as almost imperceptible tracings of form, gathering weight and deepening in colour until the petal becomes visible. It is concerned with the transformation of light into matter, suggesting the perceptible stage of a natural and cyclical process while hinting at events occurring beyond the visible spectrum.

 

Shadow Catchers by Martin Barnes, from his essay ‘Illuminations’. New edition 2012. Merrell/Victoria and Albert Museum.

Back to top

Delphinium 1-8

Read more

Homeland, Summer 1990

Flower, light, dye destruction print

each panel 28.5 x 28.5 cm / 11.25 x 11.25 "

 

In his earliest ‘photogenic drawings’, Talbot placed botanical specimens directly onto light-sensitive paper to record their image. Like falling through leaves and petals revealed a silhouette as well as intricate veins. He titled one such picture Ghost of a Plant. Emerging like a fellow apparition is Fabian Miller's sequence of images of a single flower petal, Delphinium, Homeland, Summer (1990). This was made in one day by placing the petal itself directly into an enlarger and timing subtle gradations of exposure length for each print. Too much or too little light made the form invisible. The images seem like the perceptible segment of our visible world, the rest of which is outside the realm of our visible spectrum. Taking the poetic implications of Talbot’s experiments on a journey, Delphinium explores the notion of latent image.

 

From the exhibition guide Light / The Visible Reminder of the Invisible by Martin Barnes.

Graves Art Gallery, Sheffield, 2002.

 

 

The cycle of emergence is also the subject of an earlier work, Delphinium 1–8 (1990). Made from a single delphinium petal over the course of a day, this sequence of images begins as almost imperceptible tracings of form, gathering weight and deepening in colour until the petal becomes visible. It is concerned with the transformation of light into matter, suggesting the perceptible stage of a natural and cyclical process while hinting at events occurring beyond the visible spectrum.

 

Shadow Catchers by Martin Barnes, from his essay ‘Illuminations’. New edition 2012. Merrell/Victoria and Albert Museum.

Back to top

Delphinium 1-8

Read more

Homeland, Summer 1990

Flower, light, dye destruction print

each panel 28.5 x 28.5 cm / 11.25 x 11.25 "

 

In his earliest ‘photogenic drawings’, Talbot placed botanical specimens directly onto light-sensitive paper to record their image. Like falling through leaves and petals revealed a silhouette as well as intricate veins. He titled one such picture Ghost of a Plant. Emerging like a fellow apparition is Fabian Miller's sequence of images of a single flower petal, Delphinium, Homeland, Summer (1990). This was made in one day by placing the petal itself directly into an enlarger and timing subtle gradations of exposure length for each print. Too much or too little light made the form invisible. The images seem like the perceptible segment of our visible world, the rest of which is outside the realm of our visible spectrum. Taking the poetic implications of Talbot’s experiments on a journey, Delphinium explores the notion of latent image.

 

From the exhibition guide Light / The Visible Reminder of the Invisible by Martin Barnes.

Graves Art Gallery, Sheffield, 2002.

 

 

The cycle of emergence is also the subject of an earlier work, Delphinium 1–8 (1990). Made from a single delphinium petal over the course of a day, this sequence of images begins as almost imperceptible tracings of form, gathering weight and deepening in colour until the petal becomes visible. It is concerned with the transformation of light into matter, suggesting the perceptible stage of a natural and cyclical process while hinting at events occurring beyond the visible spectrum.

 

Shadow Catchers by Martin Barnes, from his essay ‘Illuminations’. New edition 2012. Merrell/Victoria and Albert Museum.

Back to top

Delphinium 1-8

Read more

Homeland, Summer 1990

Flower, light, dye destruction print

each panel 28.5 x 28.5 cm / 11.25 x 11.25 "

 

In his earliest ‘photogenic drawings’, Talbot placed botanical specimens directly onto light-sensitive paper to record their image. Like falling through leaves and petals revealed a silhouette as well as intricate veins. He titled one such picture Ghost of a Plant. Emerging like a fellow apparition is Fabian Miller's sequence of images of a single flower petal, Delphinium, Homeland, Summer (1990). This was made in one day by placing the petal itself directly into an enlarger and timing subtle gradations of exposure length for each print. Too much or too little light made the form invisible. The images seem like the perceptible segment of our visible world, the rest of which is outside the realm of our visible spectrum. Taking the poetic implications of Talbot’s experiments on a journey, Delphinium explores the notion of latent image.

 

From the exhibition guide Light / The Visible Reminder of the Invisible by Martin Barnes.

Graves Art Gallery, Sheffield, 2002.

 

 

The cycle of emergence is also the subject of an earlier work, Delphinium 1–8 (1990). Made from a single delphinium petal over the course of a day, this sequence of images begins as almost imperceptible tracings of form, gathering weight and deepening in colour until the petal becomes visible. It is concerned with the transformation of light into matter, suggesting the perceptible stage of a natural and cyclical process while hinting at events occurring beyond the visible spectrum.

 

Shadow Catchers by Martin Barnes, from his essay ‘Illuminations’. New edition 2012. Merrell/Victoria and Albert Museum.

Back to top

Delphinium 1-8

Read more

Homeland, Summer 1990

Flower, light, dye destruction print

each panel 28.5 x 28.5 cm / 11.25 x 11.25 "

 

In his earliest ‘photogenic drawings’, Talbot placed botanical specimens directly onto light-sensitive paper to record their image. Like falling through leaves and petals revealed a silhouette as well as intricate veins. He titled one such picture Ghost of a Plant. Emerging like a fellow apparition is Fabian Miller's sequence of images of a single flower petal, Delphinium, Homeland, Summer (1990). This was made in one day by placing the petal itself directly into an enlarger and timing subtle gradations of exposure length for each print. Too much or too little light made the form invisible. The images seem like the perceptible segment of our visible world, the rest of which is outside the realm of our visible spectrum. Taking the poetic implications of Talbot’s experiments on a journey, Delphinium explores the notion of latent image.

 

From the exhibition guide Light / The Visible Reminder of the Invisible by Martin Barnes.

Graves Art Gallery, Sheffield, 2002.

 

 

The cycle of emergence is also the subject of an earlier work, Delphinium 1–8 (1990). Made from a single delphinium petal over the course of a day, this sequence of images begins as almost imperceptible tracings of form, gathering weight and deepening in colour until the petal becomes visible. It is concerned with the transformation of light into matter, suggesting the perceptible stage of a natural and cyclical process while hinting at events occurring beyond the visible spectrum.

 

Shadow Catchers by Martin Barnes, from his essay ‘Illuminations’. New edition 2012. Merrell/Victoria and Albert Museum.

Back to top

Delphinium 1-8

Read more

Homeland, Summer 1990

Flower, light, dye destruction print

each panel 28.5 x 28.5 cm / 11.25 x 11.25 "

 

In his earliest ‘photogenic drawings’, Talbot placed botanical specimens directly onto light-sensitive paper to record their image. Like falling through leaves and petals revealed a silhouette as well as intricate veins. He titled one such picture Ghost of a Plant. Emerging like a fellow apparition is Fabian Miller's sequence of images of a single flower petal, Delphinium, Homeland, Summer (1990). This was made in one day by placing the petal itself directly into an enlarger and timing subtle gradations of exposure length for each print. Too much or too little light made the form invisible. The images seem like the perceptible segment of our visible world, the rest of which is outside the realm of our visible spectrum. Taking the poetic implications of Talbot’s experiments on a journey, Delphinium explores the notion of latent image.

 

From the exhibition guide Light / The Visible Reminder of the Invisible by Martin Barnes.

Graves Art Gallery, Sheffield, 2002.

 

 

The cycle of emergence is also the subject of an earlier work, Delphinium 1–8 (1990). Made from a single delphinium petal over the course of a day, this sequence of images begins as almost imperceptible tracings of form, gathering weight and deepening in colour until the petal becomes visible. It is concerned with the transformation of light into matter, suggesting the perceptible stage of a natural and cyclical process while hinting at events occurring beyond the visible spectrum.

 

Shadow Catchers by Martin Barnes, from his essay ‘Illuminations’. New edition 2012. Merrell/Victoria and Albert Museum.

Back to top