Year Two, Lead 2

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December 2007

Oil, light, dye destruction print

50.5 x 40.5cm / 16 x 20 ” 

 

Garry Fabian Miller’s images have for many years been looking for the beauty and mystery of brightness in the dark. It is something that has always stalked the modern imagination.

 

The Colour of Time by Garry Fabian Miller, from the essay ‘The Majesty of Darkness’ by Adam Nicolson. Black Dog, London 2010.

 

On days such as these I have seen both the Spectre of the Brocken and a parhelion when walking on Hameldown. This connects to our early conversation about Ruskin and the Romantic Movement. Coleridge and others would go on walking tours in Germany to the Harz mountains seeking a glimpse of the conjunction between clouds, sky and shadows that brings forward a figure across the cloud floor. Or more often the parhelion or a spectral double sun. Experiences such as these change your world and greatly influence the pictures I make. All of the preceding quiet days of walking open the possibility of these sudden discoveries. They come from an unfolding familiarity with places experienced in different weather, seasons, light and most importantly the accumulation and then passing of time. Virginia Woolf talks in her diary of looking at the night sky and the moon, and experiencing a ‘great and astonishing sense of something there which is ‘it’ ’ (Diary, 27 February 1926) and Stephan Graham writes in his book The Gentle Art of Tramping (1923) ‘As you sit beside a hillside, or lie prone under the trees of the forest, or sprawl wet-legged by a mountain stream, the great door, that does not look like a door, opens.’

I believe in this opening of a golden door. I made a cycle of pictures (Year Two, 2008) each lasting one-month, a lunar cycle, and each series named after minerals found in the ground I walked upon. In the last series, Lead, this idea of experiencing the opening door was imagined.

 

HOME Dartmoor by Garry Fabian Miller. Filtow 2012.

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Year Two, Lead 1

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December 2007

Oil, light, dye destruction print

50.5 x 40.5cm / 16 x 20 ” 

 

Garry Fabian Miller’s images have for many years been looking for the beauty and mystery of brightness in the dark. It is something that has always stalked the modern imagination.

 

The Colour of Time by Garry Fabian Miller, from the essay ‘The Majesty of Darkness’ by Adam Nicolson. Black Dog, London 2010.

 

On days such as these I have seen both the Spectre of the Brocken and a parhelion when walking on Hameldown. This connects to our early conversation about Ruskin and the Romantic Movement. Coleridge and others would go on walking tours in Germany to the Harz mountains seeking a glimpse of the conjunction between clouds, sky and shadows that brings forward a figure across the cloud floor. Or more often the parhelion or a spectral double sun. Experiences such as these change your world and greatly influence the pictures I make. All of the preceding quiet days of walking open the possibility of these sudden discoveries. They come from an unfolding familiarity with places experienced in different weather, seasons, light and most importantly the accumulation and then passing of time. Virginia Woolf talks in her diary of looking at the night sky and the moon, and experiencing a ‘great and astonishing sense of something there which is ‘it’ ’ (Diary, 27 February 1926) and Stephan Graham writes in his book The Gentle Art of Tramping (1923) ‘As you sit beside a hillside, or lie prone under the trees of the forest, or sprawl wet-legged by a mountain stream, the great door, that does not look like a door, opens.’

I believe in this opening of a golden door. I made a cycle of pictures (Year Two, 2008) each lasting one-month, a lunar cycle, and each series named after minerals found in the ground I walked upon. In the last series, Lead, this idea of experiencing the opening door was imagined.

 

HOME Dartmoor by Garry Fabian Miller. Filtow 2012.

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Year Two, Lead 8

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December 2007

Oil, light, dye destruction print

50.5 x 40.5cm / 16 x 20 ” 

 

Garry Fabian Miller’s images have for many years been looking for the beauty and mystery of brightness in the dark. It is something that has always stalked the modern imagination.

 

The Colour of Time by Garry Fabian Miller, from the essay ‘The Majesty of Darkness’ by Adam Nicolson. Black Dog, London 2010.

 

On days such as these I have seen both the Spectre of the Brocken and a parhelion when walking on Hameldown. This connects to our early conversation about Ruskin and the Romantic Movement. Coleridge and others would go on walking tours in Germany to the Harz mountains seeking a glimpse of the conjunction between clouds, sky and shadows that brings forward a figure across the cloud floor. Or more often the parhelion or a spectral double sun. Experiences such as these change your world and greatly influence the pictures I make. All of the preceding quiet days of walking open the possibility of these sudden discoveries. They come from an unfolding familiarity with places experienced in different weather, seasons, light and most importantly the accumulation and then passing of time. Virginia Woolf talks in her diary of looking at the night sky and the moon, and experiencing a ‘great and astonishing sense of something there which is ‘it’ ’ (Diary, 27 February 1926) and Stephan Graham writes in his book The Gentle Art of Tramping (1923) ‘As you sit beside a hillside, or lie prone under the trees of the forest, or sprawl wet-legged by a mountain stream, the great door, that does not look like a door, opens.’

I believe in this opening of a golden door. I made a cycle of pictures (Year Two, 2008) each lasting one-month, a lunar cycle, and each series named after minerals found in the ground I walked upon. In the last series, Lead, this idea of experiencing the opening door was imagined.

 

HOME Dartmoor by Garry Fabian Miller. Filtow 2012.

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