2008

Gabriel (detail)

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February 2008

Oil, water, light, dye destruction print

40.5 x 50.5 cm / 16 x 20 ”

 

The mysterious beauty of Garry Fabian Miller’s images makes us crave a practical explanation. How are these works, that seem to emanate an inner luminescence, achieved? Essentially, these are photographs made without a camera. In his darkroom Fabian Miller works intently. He shines light through glass vessels filled with oil, water and other liquids, which give the works their colours. Sometimes he constructs simple cut paper forms and places these on wooden columns at varying distances from the light beam to cast shadows on the photographic paper. Exposures can last several minutes. The results are hand printed by the artist. This is not a process where more images can be produced from a negative: light is recorded as light, dark as dark. The special type of photographic paper used renders a lustrous, direct colour positive, making each image a unique creation. As such, there is an importance about the physicality of the photograph as object as much as image. The results are skillfully controlled lights events caught in time. The simplicity of the method does not diminish the allure of the final creation: rather it has a deep and satisfying physical and conceptual purity. On one level, these images can be absorbed for their visceral pleasures of sensing light and colour. To be understood further, Fabian Miller’s works can be positioned simultaneously in the development of abstract art and in a lineage of innovative minds – fascinated with the almost magical interaction of light on paper – that can be traced to the dawn of photography.

 

Blue Gold by Garry Fabian Miller, from the essay by Martin Barnes, Curator, Photographs, Victoria and Albert Museum in the catalogue accompanying the exhibition Garry Fabian Miller, Blue Gold, 23 April-29 May 2004, Hamiltons, London.

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Gabriel

Read more

February 2008

Oil, water, light, dye destruction print

40.5 x 50.5 cm / 16 x 20 ”

 

The mysterious beauty of Garry Fabian Miller’s images makes us crave a practical explanation. How are these works, that seem to emanate an inner luminescence, achieved? Essentially, these are photographs made without a camera. In his darkroom Fabian Miller works intently. He shines light through glass vessels filled with oil, water and other liquids, which give the works their colours. Sometimes he constructs simple cut paper forms and places these on wooden columns at varying distances from the light beam to cast shadows on the photographic paper. Exposures can last several minutes. The results are hand printed by the artist. This is not a process where more images can be produced from a negative: light is recorded as light, dark as dark. The special type of photographic paper used renders a lustrous, direct colour positive, making each image a unique creation. As such, there is an importance about the physicality of the photograph as object as much as image. The results are skillfully controlled lights events caught in time. The simplicity of the method does not diminish the allure of the final creation: rather it has a deep and satisfying physical and conceptual purity. On one level, these images can be absorbed for their visceral pleasures of sensing light and colour. To be understood further, Fabian Miller’s works can be positioned simultaneously in the development of abstract art and in a lineage of innovative minds – fascinated with the almost magical interaction of light on paper – that can be traced to the dawn of photography.

 

Blue Gold by Garry Fabian Miller, from the essay by Martin Barnes, Curator, Photographs, Victoria and Albert Museum in the catalogue accompanying the exhibition Garry Fabian Miller, Blue Gold, 23 April-29 May 2004, Hamiltons, London.

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